Jigsaw Puzzles

Well, well, well.  It has been a long time since my last post.  I am proud to say that my last blog, back in June of 2016, was instrumental in the wave of votes that kept Donald Trump out of the White House.  Imagine the disaster that would have been.  By now, he probably would have lowered the level of public discourse with his comments and tweets that….oh, who knows…he’d probably have retweeted anti-Muslim hate videos and supported a conservative pedophile for Senate.  Well, all I can say is, “You’re welcome.”

So how have I been spending the last year and a half?  Pretty much the same as before, but after working on my book, I was kind of written out for a while.  Something I have been doing most recently is working on a jigsaw puzzle of Van Gogh’s lovely painting of a Paris cafe at night.  Three thoughts accompany me as I slowly construct the puzzle from the thousand pieces that started as a pile on my table.

First thought: If you want to become awed and amazed by an artist’s work with color, get a jigsaw puzzle of their work.  Each little piece is just a splash of one or a number of colors.  Gazing at the piece alone, you can never quite gather what it depicts.  However, when I insert the splash of colors into its rightful place, the greater image materializes.  Working such a puzzle allows me to walk with the artist in his own creative process and, with a guy like Van Gogh, note how quickly he must have created a deeply evocative image with just a few brush strokes.  Try it.  It is very relaxing.

Second thought: If you want to deepen your Myers-Briggs Sensing function (or simply satisfy its needs), work a jigsaw puzzle.  First, it is a feast for the senses – more specifically, vision.  I have said to myself many, many times during the past few weeks how blessed I am to have sight, so I can enjoy this process.  Also, the careful organization that a jigsaw puzzle requires promotes the strengths of Sensing.  Detail, care, organization – all are there to be massaged.  Last night I took all the orange and golden pieces and set to work on the middle portion of the picture.  I was so happy to have the available pieces right there in front of me for easy pickins.

Third thought: Many times, I would take a piece that looked like it belonged right there, only to find that it was too big for the space provided.  There was a part of me that wanted to jam it in so it would fit.  But obviously, you can’t do that.  This put me in mind of people who willfully refuse to see what is right there in front of them and insist on jamming a piece into place that manifestly does not belong.  Hmm, seems like I started this post with just this topic!  Anit-abortion pedophile for Senate, anybody?

This entry was posted in Musings.